Skip to Content

Locomoting into New Niches: Limbs, Ecology, and Evolution in Mustelid Mammals Project Public
77 Media · Managed by: Brandon Kilbourne

Filter:
View results as:
List Gallery
List of media items in this team
  ID Part Object Taxonomy Type Date Added Publication Status  
000070222 Radius zmb:mam:59069 Lutra lutra Ct image series 2019-02-18 Open Download  
000070223 Ulna zmb:mam:59069 Lutra lutra Ct image series 2019-02-18 Open Download  
000076031 Ulna zmuc:5437 Taxidea taxus Ct image series 2019-04-25 Open Download  
000076025 Radius zmuc:5437 Taxidea taxus Ct image series 2019-04-25 Open Download  
000076024 Humerus zmuc:5437 Taxidea taxus Ct image series 2019-04-25 Open Download  
000071866 Ulna zmb:mam:70628 Ictonyx striatus Ct image series 2019-03-14 Open Download  
000071863 Humerus zmb:mam:70628 Ictonyx striatus Ct image series 2019-03-14 Open Download  
000071864 Radius zmb:mam:70628 Ictonyx striatus Ct image series 2019-03-14 Open Download  
000071862 Ulna zmb:mam:70627 Ictonyx striatus Ct image series 2019-03-14 Open Download  
000071861 Radius zmb:mam:70627 Ictonyx striatus Ct image series 2019-03-14 Open Download  
Rows per page
Showing 1 - 10 of 77
Filter:
View results as:
List Gallery

DESCRIPTION

A pivotal aspect of locomotion in limbed vertebrates is that the limb bones must be able to withstand the forces incurred during locomotion while transmitting the forces generated by limb muscles. The morphology of a limb bone is intimately tied to its mechanical loading regime, and, as such, long bone morphology should reflect ecological specializations. Using museum specimens, this project measures traits associated with bone internal structure, including bone cross-sectional area (CSA), second moment of area (SMA), and section modulus (MOD). CSA and SMA provide the bone’s resistance to axial and bending loads, respectively. Though bone cross-sectional properties have been studied in terms of interspecific scaling relationships or during the ontogeny of individual species, it has yet to be investigated how bone cross-sectional properties vary within a functionally diverse lineage. Moreover, it also remains unknown if bone cross-sectional traits are subject to distinct selective pressures as lineages evolve new locomotor habits. Given the locomotor diversity of mustelid mammals, including climbing, digging, and swimming specialists, this project investigates whether bone cross-sectional properties differ among locomotor habit further fitting cross-sectional properties to models of trait diversification.

DETAILS

RELATED LINKS

STATISTICS

Number of media
77
Number of represented specimens
Number of represented cultural heritage objects
Project views
(Not yet implemented)
Number of media downloads
(Not yet implemented)

PROJECT TAGS

(Not yet implemented)